Mental Health Awareness: Top Tips

May is Mental Health Awareness Month in the UK. It is a time dedicated to raising awareness of mental health, the struggles it can cause, as well as provide tips to help look after our own mental health.

As a company, Web-Translations works with freelancers on a daily basis. Working from home can be isolating as you may spend days without talking to another person, and communication is often done via email. At Web-Translations, we also work from home, and we have acknowledged how important our mental health really is. This is why we want to take a moment to raise awareness and share some tips that may help.


This week we will be sharing some ideas of how to look after your mental health, some translated mindful books and even some tips for how to respect mental health when marketing international campaigns. But for today here are some of our top tips to looking after your mental wellbeing:

Take breaks

Taking breaks is so important to allow ourselves some time to recharge. It can be a short 5-minute break, or even a 2-week long holiday, but just taking time to relax is really beneficial. Although we may think that working non-stop every day means that we will achieve our full potential, this is not the case. Breaks reduce exhaustion and increase energy levels, which in turn will allow for increased productivity.

15 minutes in nature

Nature is an amazing tool for helping our mental health, and it’s literally on our doorstep. Starting your day in nature is proven to be grounding and allows for a relaxed start to the day. I personally like to drink my morning cup of tea outside and set myself up for the day ahead.

Forest path

Set boundaries and learn to say no

Similarly, it’s difficult to say no and set boundaries in our daily lives. Whether it’s meeting up with friends, taking on a task that’s too much or you don’t have time for, or even feeling guilty when we need to take a sick day at work. But it’s time to look after our own mental wellbeing and start to say no to the things that we don’t have time to do. Or maybe start saying no to the things that we don’t want to do. We are all different and that’s okay.

Mobile-free hour

Technology has allowed society to advance to levels that we didn’t think were possible 20 years ago. However, it has also contributed negatively to mental health in some cases. Not only does it allow for us to easily compare ourselves with others on social media, but many people rely on technology every day. It’s often the first thing that we reach for when we wake up and then last thing that we see before we go to sleep. By starting your day with a mobile-free hour, you don’t wake up to a stressful email and you don’t see the list of tasks that people are asking you to do throughout the day. You can begin the day as you want to.

Mobile phone in a hand

Exercise

Exercise has been scientifically proven to boost our mood and reduce stress levels. This can play an important part in the care of our mental health. You could go on a walk, go to a dance class, hit the gym, or even do some yoga. Find an exercise that you enjoy and maybe find a group to join too.

Check in with colleagues and family members

A simple smile or ‘how are you doing?’ can go a really long way, especially if someone is struggling. You can never know what’s really going on in someone’s life, so checking in is a great way top help people feel that they can talk to you.

Pet cuddles

Pets are amazing at improving mental health. Although they have no way of communicating verbally, their affection and actions can speak a thousand words. If you’re having a bad day, they are there to cry on. If you have had a stressful call, they are there to listen to you. And they are there to bring a smile to your face when they want to play with their favourite toy.

Below you will see our furry friends – Colyn, Clive, Tommy and Lola. They always put a smile on our faces.

Photos of the office's dogs

We hope these tips can help you care for your mental health. Also keep an eye on our social media for more mental health related content.

By continuing to use this site, you agree to the use of cookies. For more information, read our Privacy Policy

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close