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W-T translate website for ZSL London Zoo

“At ZSL London Zoo we use Web-Translations to communicate key messages to our visitors from across the world.
The key pages we selected were translated quickly and accurately and have been a huge benefit.
Key pages such as how to find us, opening times and prices were translated into five key languages based on our visitors countries.
We have used Web-Translations for a number of years and find them helpful and efficient.”

Daniel Sprawson – Digital Communications Manager – ZSL London Zoo

"Excellent" customer service for The BrookLodge Hotel & Wells Spa

“The work was completed extremely quickly, and the customer service I received from the team was excellent. Our website is now multilingual, which has greatly assisted in our on-going campaign to attract more overseas visitors to the BrookLodge and I intend to add more languages to expand on this success. I would definitely recommend to all hotels based in the UK and Ireland that they localise their websites to ensure that they have the best possible chance in a highly competitive market.”

Eoin Doyle, Director – The BrookLodge & Wells Spa

Global steel company Outokumpu relies on Web-Translations for high quality translations

“We use Web-Translations for all our translation projects, and get excellent service. The nature of many of our texts is very technical, but Web-Translations is more than capable of providing translations that are up to our high standard. We review these internally, and therefore know that the quality of technical translation is very good.

Web-Translations is prompt and reliable, which means that we at Outokumpu can direct our energies elsewhere, knowing our translation projects are in good hands.

I also find the pricing very competitive for the level of service we require and receive.”

Nora Berg, Communications Officer – External Communications – Outokumpu Oyj

"Slave earrings" translation blunder causes great offence

Vogue Italia has been widely criticised for the feature it ran on its blog this Monday, a piece entitled “Slave Earrings” that has since been removed.

The post read: “Jewellery has always flirted with circular shapes, especially for use in making earrings. The most classic models are the slave and creole styles in gold hoops.”

It continued: “If the name brings to the mind the decorative traditions of the women of colour who were brought to the southern United States during the slave trade, the latest interpretation is pure freedom. Colored stones, symbolic pendants and multiple spheres. And the evolution goes on.” (more…)

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